This library highlights examples of state laws, policies, initiatives, and programs aligned with whole child design. It is intended to help policymakers, educators, and other key stakeholders learn how states across the country are pursuing whole child policy and systems change. The library is not an exhaustive compilation of all the whole child work states have taken on and will be periodically updated with new examples as states continue to innovate and redesign to support every child’s learning and developmental needs. If you have a state policy example you would like to share, please submit it using this form.

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Displaying 101 - 150 of 179 examples

Redesigning Curriculum, Instruction, Assessments, and Accountability Systems
Support Authentic Systems of Assessment

In 2019, North Carolina received a waiver through the U.S. Department of Education’s Innovative Assessment Demonstration Authority (IADA) to improve formative assessment in the state. Under the IADA waiver, North Carolina has developed the North Carolina Personalized Assessment Tool, a pilot system of “through-grade” assessment opportunities (i.e., a formative assessment throughout the year) in grades 4 and 7 that provide real time, detailed feedback to students, educators, and stakeholders and serve as a reliable progress indicator for each student. The goal of the pilot is to expand the Personalized Assessment Tool to grades 3-8 by the 2023–24 academic year.
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Last Updated: May 20, 2022
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To support educator understanding of the role, scoring, and use of performance assessments and how they relate to teaching, Oregon participates in the Building Educator Assessment Literacy (BEAL) project, a partnership between WestEd and the Stanford Center for Assessment, Learning and Equity (SCALE). BEAL training workshops focus on demystifying the purpose and application of different assessments, including Smarter Balanced performance assessments, and provide content and training on assessment literacy. By collaboratively scoring student work from Smarter Balanced performance tasks and reflecting on how to respond to evidence of student learning, BEAL participants gain a better understanding of what student proficiency looks like and how to provide feedback to advance student learning. (For more information about this state example, see Redesigning Curriculum, Instruction, Assessment, and Accountability Systems.)
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Last Updated: May 20, 2022
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Oregon’s local performance assessment requirement requires school districts to administer one or more performance assessments in grades 3 through 8 and high school in these subjects: mathematics, scientific inquiry, speaking, and writing. Districts are not limited to administering performance assessments in the key content areas. Oregon encourages districts to use local performance assessments in other skill areas as long as they support the local curriculum.
OR
Last Updated: May 20, 2022
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For several years, Washington state has provided a 2-day ongoing professional development session for kindergarten teachers at the beginning of the school year related to the Washington Kindergarten Inventory of Developing Skills (WaKIDS), the state’s kindergarten entry assessment. WaKIDS is linked to the state’s early learning guidelines preschool curriculum but has been modified to be more culturally responsive and include a parent engagement component. The assessments also include a Whole Child Assessment focusing on the social and emotional learning, as well as the physical, linguistic, and cognitive development, of kindergarten students. (For more information about this state example, see Redesigning Curriculum, Instruction, Assessment, and Accountability Systems.)
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Last Updated: May 20, 2022
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Redesigning Curriculum, Instruction, Assessments, and Accountability Systems
Adopt a Comprehensive Accountability System for Continuous Improvement

As part of a broader transition to a new school funding and accountability system that relies on multiple measures of student and school success, California launched the California School Dashboard in 2017. The dashboard looks at a range of indicators for supporting continuous improvement and identifying schools that need additional support. Annual school- and district-level results, reported by federally required student subgroups, are detailed on the dashboard. The dashboard tracks progress on each indicator and includes an equity component, which tracks outcomes and progress across student subgroups. (For more information about this state example, see Redesigning Curriculum, Instruction, Assessment, and Accountability Systems.)
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Last Updated: May 20, 2022
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New York’s Parent Dashboard was launched in October 2020 to provide information on school climate; accountability status of schools; per-student funding; college, career, and civic readiness; and school and district location and contact information. The state also provides the following information on New York state schools as a part of its accountability reporting system: enrollment totals, class size, leadership, assessment results, financial transparency, and geographic location. The state also includes information about high school graduation pathways and access to AP classes.
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Last Updated: May 20, 2022
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North Carolina is one of just a handful of states to integrate its quality rating and improvement system (QRIS) into its child care licensing system, thus requiring that all early childhood programs receive a program quality rating to be licensed. Child care providers must maintain a three-star license (out of five stars) to continue receiving state subsidies, and North Carolina pre-k providers must maintain a four- or five-star license.
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Last Updated: May 20, 2022
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In addition to assessment outcomes and graduation rates, Oregon’s Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) accountability system includes several measures of students’ opportunities to learn and access to a well-rounded education, including chronic absenteeism, college and career readiness (as measured by the percentage of 9th-grade students who have earned enough credits to be on track to graduate on time), and a 5-year high school completion rate. Oregon’s state ESSA plan also includes measures of social and emotional learning (SEL) and school climate. The state has developed social-emotional standards for early educators and SEL resources to support educators through presentation materials, student handouts, and facilitator guides for all grade levels. (For more information about this state example, see Redesigning Curriculum, Instruction, Assessment, and Accountability Systems.)
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Last Updated: May 20, 2022
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Redesigning Curriculum, Instruction, Assessments, and Accountability Systems
Strengthen Distance and Blended Learning Models

In 2020, Maine passed a resolution directing the Maine Department of Education to establish a platform to facilitate the provision of online, virtual instruction by state-certified teachers for every public school student in the state. The resolution also calls for the provision of a variety of high-quality professional development opportunities to educators across the state.
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Last Updated: May 20, 2022
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Wyoming has created a Digital Learning Plan with standards for digital learning that articulate how technology should be used to empower learners through a robust structure for implementation based on the Future Ready Framework for personalized, student-centered learning. By combining guidance, standards, training, and broadband connectivity, Wyoming’s digital learning plan encourages more effective uses of technology and offers a strong model for other states to learn from. (For more information about this state example, see Redesigning Curriculum, Instruction, Assessment, and Accountability Systems.)
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Last Updated: May 20, 2022
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Building Adult Capacity and Expertise
Design Educator Preparation Systems for Whole Child Learning and Development

California has transformed its system of educator certification and preparation program accreditation over the past decade by revising its teacher and leader preparation standards to more closely align with the demand for 21st century skills and to support whole child development; implementing teacher and leader performance assessments as a condition of licensure, thereby requiring educators to demonstrate they have met the state’s standards for educator preparation; and implementing a more performance-based system of program approval and accreditation. The state also updated preparation standards to place a strong emphasis on all teachers’ and school leaders’ understanding of student development, how to create a positive climate, and how to use restorative practices in the classroom and school. (For more information about this state example, see Building Adult Capacity and Expertise.)
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Last Updated: May 20, 2022
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Colorado House Bill 1053 was enacted in 2020 to support the early childhood educator workforce, including tasking the Colorado State Board of Education with establishing standards for licensing that facilitate recruitment and retention of Colorado’s early childhood educator workforce.
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Last Updated: May 20, 2022
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Georgia’s partnership with the Network for Transforming Educator Preparation (NTEP) led to a statewide collaboration that looks at licensure, program approval, and data collection to improve teacher preparation in the state. Georgia’s work with NTEP has led the state to increase requirements to enter the teaching profession, including adding a performance assessment to better measure educators’ skills and knowledge in practice, improving teacher preparation programs in the state by increasing the focus on clinical experiences, and monitoring state data related to educator effectiveness.
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Last Updated: May 20, 2022
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In December 2020, the Illinois State Board of Education adopted Culturally Responsive Teaching and Leading Standards. These new standards were developed by the board’s Diverse and Learner Ready Teacher Network so that individuals in the state’s educator pipeline would learn how to teach a diverse set of students. Specifically, the Culturally Responsive Teaching and Leading Standards are broken down into eight categories to guide educators in creating safe, inclusive, and equitable learning environments. Overall, the standards focus on gaining a better understanding of students’ life experiences, connecting with students and families, fostering student agency, making instruction meaningful, and valuing student input.
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Last Updated: May 20, 2022
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Since the late 1990s, New Jersey has been expanding its investments in higher education and ongoing professional learning. To begin with, it created multiple pathways to a P-3 credential, including traditional 4-year bachelor’s degree programs; postbaccalaureate programs; and an alternate route program, which allows students with a bachelor’s to earn a credential while working in state preschool programs. State-funded scholarships and stipends enabled most early educators to go back to school. Finally, pay parity with k–12 teachers—mandated by the court for all teachers with P–3 certification, including educators in Head Start and private preschool centers—was a critical incentive to attract and retain educators who otherwise might leave for better-paying k–12 positions. (For more information about this state example, see Building Adult Capacity and Expertise.)
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Last Updated: May 20, 2022
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In 2019, Washington updated its standards for educator preparation programs to align with the state’s k–12 social and emotional learning (SEL) standards. The state also requires teacher and principal preparation programs to ensure candidates can recognize signs of emotional or behavioral distress in students and refer them to the appropriate supports. (For more information about this state example, see Building Adult Capacity and Expertise.)
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Last Updated: May 20, 2022
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Building Adult Capacity and Expertise
Adopt Proactive Teacher Recruitment And Retention Strategies

In recognition of teacher efficacy being the key to quality, explicit attention to teacher pay has been part of Alabama’s pre-k program from its inception in 2000–01. Pay scales have been specified in classroom grant agreements, and funding for incremental increases in pre-k teacher salaries has been provided since 2007. The recent push beyond compensation improvement toward compensation parity was driven by a desire to retain trained pre-k teachers in the face of an immediate concern that pay disparities between community-based centers and school settings was driving turnover and instability in community-based settings.
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Last Updated: May 20, 2022
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In 2020, Alaska launched a working group of teachers, administrators, and other stakeholders to study high teacher turnover rates and the inability to recruit and retain teachers in the state. Over the course of a year, the working group reviewed the causes of the state’s teacher retention and recruitment (TRR) challenges and developed a framework, the TRR Action Plan, to address the issues. The plan proposes six essential focus areas: (1) strengthening working conditions, (2) developing leadership, (3) restructuring retirement options, (4) enhancing recruitment efforts and opportunities, (5) creating paraprofessional pathways, and (6) streamlining certification and recertification. Alaska is now working to implement elements of the TRR Action Plan, including exploring financial incentives for new teachers, supporting existing grow-your-own programs, and identifying measures of working conditions to support data-driven improvements.
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Last Updated: May 20, 2022
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To address disparities in teacher pay within the state and compared to surrounding states, the Arkansas legislature created the Teacher Salary Equalization Fund in 2021. Through the fund, school districts and charter schools that have an annual teacher salary below the statewide target average will receive additional funding to raise salaries. The goals of the fund include (1) regular increases in the state average teacher salary, (2) improved ranking among Southern Regional Education Board states, (3) ongoing reduction in salary disparities within the state, (4) decreased teacher attrition rates, and (5) an increased number of districts with a starting teacher salary above the minimum required by state statute.
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Last Updated: May 20, 2022
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Since 1997, Arkansas has supported its teachers in becoming National Board Certified through financial assistance and salary bonuses. In 2017, Arkansas passed Act 937, which provides a $5,000-per-year bonus for 10 years for teachers holding National Board Certification prior to January 1, 2018, and any Nationally Board Certified teacher working in a high-poverty school, and a $2,500 annual bonus for those working in low-poverty schools.
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Last Updated: May 20, 2022
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In 2021, California invested more than $1 billion to support teacher preparation, including $500 million for the Golden State Teacher Grant program, which provides $20,000 scholarships for teacher candidates who commit to teaching 4 years in a high-need school, $350 million to expand teacher residency programs, and $125 million to expand a Grow Your Own program to support classified staff in becoming teachers.
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Last Updated: May 20, 2022
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The Florida Minority Teacher Education Scholarship (MTES) program aims to improve the number of teachers of color in Florida’s schools. MTES is supported by the Florida Fund for Minority Teachers, administered by a governor-appointed board of directors, which provides up to $4,000 per year in scholarship funds for 3 years and pre-teaching professional development to recruit teachers of color.
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Last Updated: May 20, 2022
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Georgia’s pre-k parity pay policy began by addressing starting salary disparities for pre-k teachers and has recently introduced salary supplements based on experience and credentials. Specifically, as of the 2016–17 school year, teachers in public and private settings receive a 3% increase on top of the minimum, base salary for every 2 years of experience, up to 20 years. Georgia also used federal COVID-19 relief funds to provide for pre-k and child care teacher bonuses in January 2021.
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Last Updated: May 20, 2022
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Illinois supplemented its existing Teaching Excellence Program with COVID-19 relief funds to help more teachers become National Board Certified Teachers (NBCTs). Through Public Act 101-0654, which went into effect in March 2021, the Teaching Excellence Program was amended to provide teachers and counselors who seek to become NBCTs during the 2021–22 school year with a $1,900 fee subsidy. The amended bill also provides up to $1,000 for existing NBCTs to renew their certifications, up to $1,500 for NBCT mentors, a one-time incentive of $3,000 for NBCTs in rural or remote school districts, and annual incentives of between $2,500 and $3,200 for rural NBCT liaisons and candidate cohort facilitators.
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Last Updated: May 20, 2022
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Louisiana provides three pathways to teaching: (1) a pre-educator program and technical diploma for high school students interested in education; (2) an undergraduate teaching degree; and (3) a postbaccalaureate program that prepares non-education majors for a career in teaching. The Aspiring Educator/Pre-educator Pathway is a Grow Your Own model to recruit high school students into the profession and continue to support them through college into the profession, with a particular focus on recruiting teachers of color. The undergraduate and graduate pathways include a competency-based curriculum and a yearlong teaching residency.
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Last Updated: May 20, 2022
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In 2021, the Mississippi legislature passed House Bill (H.B.) 135, reenacting previous financial incentive programs to recruit and retain teachers in critical shortage areas. These incentives include providing moving expenses and housing assistance for teachers who are hired by school districts deemed to be in critical geographic shortage areas. Teachers must reside outside of the critical shortage area before being hired and move into the boundaries of the hiring district to be eligible. Upon hiring, teachers may apply for relocation cost reimbursement, including up to $1,000 for moving expenses and $6,000 in housing assistance. H.B. 135 also established the University Assisted Teacher Recruitment and Retention Grant Program, which provides scholarships to licensed teachers who are already teaching in geographical shortage areas, are pursuing a Master of Education or Education Specialist degree at an approved institute of higher education, and agree to remain employed in a shortage district for a minimum of 3 years.
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Last Updated: May 20, 2022
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In 2019, as a part of Montana’s efforts to recruit and retain “high quality, prepared, and experienced educators,” the state revamped its Quality Educator Loan Assistance Program (QELA) via House Bill 211. The program, which was previously in effect from 2007 to 2017, provides loan assistance to newly hired educators who work in a state-identified critical content shortage area, serve at an impacted school, and meet certain certification standards. The program targets rural schools and those located on Indian reservations. Teachers can receive loan assistance for up to 4 years—$3,000 in year 1, $4,000 in year 2, and $5,000 in years 3 and 4—for a total of $17,000. The state legislature reallocated $500,000 in annual funding for QELA in 2019, covering the first 3 years of loan assistance and authorizing a final year to be covered by the qualifying school or district. In addition, the 2019 bill moved the administration of the program from the state’s Office of the Commissioner of Higher Education to the Office of Public Instruction and broadened the eligibility criteria so that more schools experiencing teacher shortages qualify.
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Last Updated: May 20, 2022
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In 2019, New Mexico enacted the Grow Your Own Teachers Act, which provides a scholarship for educational assistants (EAs) currently serving in New Mexico schools to earn a bachelor’s degree in education and a teaching credential. The program provides for professional leave as needed and a scholarship of up to $6,000 per year for 5 years ($30,000 total), based on applicants’ financial need. Regulations for the program require postsecondary institutions to prioritize awards to EAs who are closest to completion of a teacher preparation program and those serving in high-need fields (bilingual education, early childhood education, special education, and other high-need positions as defined by the New Mexico Public Education Department).
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Last Updated: May 20, 2022
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In 1993, the North Carolina General Assembly created the NC Principal Fellows Program to provide scholarship funding to eligible educators to become school administrators and to increase the principal pipeline. The program includes 2 years of preparation that encompass both coursework and a yearlong, full-time internship under the mentorship of an expert principal. In exchange, principal candidates agree to 4 years of service as a principal or assistant principal in one of the state’s public schools. In 2021, the NC Principal Fellows Program merged with the Transforming Principal Preparation Program, which provides state grants to principal preparation programs implementing research-based approaches to preparing principal candidates (For more information about this state example, see Building Adult Capacity and Expertise.)
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Last Updated: May 20, 2022
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Oklahoma provides full compensation parity, including salary, benefits, and payment for professional responsibilities, as part of its universal Four-Year-Old Pre-K program. Oklahoma also has one of the lowest gaps in salaries between preschool teachers and kindergarten teachers. (For more information about this state example, see Building Adult Capacity and Expertise.)

OK
Last Updated: May 20, 2022
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In 2017, the Oregon state legislature established the Oregon Teacher Scholars Program to increase the diversity of the teacher workforce by targeting culturally and linguistically diverse students who are already enrolled in teacher preparation programs. Scholars are awarded $5,000 per year for up to 2 years, and they can use the money for any educational expense, such as tuition or living costs. (For more information about this state example, see Building Adult Capacity and Expertise.)
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Last Updated: May 20, 2022
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Pennsylvania launched a $2 million competitive grant program in 2018 to support the growth of teacher and leader residencies in the state to improve educator recruitment, preparation, and retention and increase the diversity of the educator workforce. In the most recent round of funding (2020–21), the Pennsylvania Department of Education awarded four universities roughly $800,000 to increase the supply of qualified principals in Pennsylvania. The funds are intended to provide financial support to principals as they engage in clinical training (i.e., residency programs). (For more information about this state example, see Building Adult Capacity and Expertise.)
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Last Updated: May 20, 2022
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The Tennessee Grow Your Own (GYO) Competitive Grant was started with COVID-19 relief funds in August 2020. The program provides $2 million in grant funding to support partnerships between educator preparation programs and local education agencies to provide no-cost pathways to teaching. The initiative can also support existing GYO partnerships in the state that are run through the University of Tennessee, Knoxville; Austin Peay State University; and Lipscomb University.
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Last Updated: May 20, 2022
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Started in 2018, the Texas Grow Your Own (GYO) Grant Program provides competitive grant funding to school districts and higher education programs to improve teacher recruitment and retainment issues through three pathways. First, the grants can support districts in recruiting high school students by offering dual-credit opportunities. Second, they can help districts develop paraprofessionals and other existing school staff into certified teachers. And third, grants can be used to encourage educator preparation programs to partner with districts to provide yearlong clinical teaching experiences for future educators. The Texas Education Agency is currently awarding grants through 2023.
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Last Updated: May 20, 2022
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Passed as a part of House Bill 3 in 2019, the Texas Teacher Incentive Allotment is designed to reward, attract, and retain highly effective teachers, particularly those teaching in traditionally hard-to-staff schools in rural areas of the state. Districts receive an increasing allotment between $3,000 and $32,000 per year based on teacher qualifications (including National Board Certification) and their school’s socioeconomic and rural status. The majority of these funds are passed on to teachers.
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Last Updated: May 20, 2022
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Washington House Bill 1139, enacted in 2019, expands the educator workforce supply through evidence-based strategies; improves and incentivizes the recruitment and retention of highly effective educators, especially in high-need subject, grade-level, and geographic areas; and establishes a cohesive continuum of high-quality professional learning from preparation programs to job-embedded induction, mentoring, collaboration, and other professional development opportunities.
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Last Updated: May 20, 2022
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Washington state has supported Grow Your Own (GYO) programs to prepare educators in multiple ways. In 2017, Washington supported nine GYO programs with a total of $1.8 million in block grant funds through the state’s Alternative Routes Block Grant (ARBG). ARBG funds support districts in addressing their workforce needs by providing service scholarships for candidates while they earn their teaching credentials in exchange for teaching at a qualified state school. In addition, Washington’s Pipeline for Paraeducators Conditional Loan Scholarship Program provides up to $4,000 for educational expenses to paraprofessionals and alumni of the Recruiting Washington Teachers program. (For more information about this state example, see Building Adult Capacity and Expertise.)

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Last Updated: May 20, 2022
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Building Adult Capacity and Expertise
Support High-Quality Mentoring and Induction Programs

Passed by the Connecticut legislature in 2009, the Teacher Education and Mentoring (TEAM) program focuses on supporting beginning teachers in five professional growth areas related to the Common Core of Teaching: (1) classroom management, (2) planning, (3) instruction, (4) assessments, and (5) professional responsibility. Teachers and mentors undergo a cycle of professional learning, reflection, and growth-based practices and activities. (For more information about this state example, see Building Adult Capacity and Expertise.)
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Last Updated: May 20, 2022
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Delaware requires that all new teachers participate in a 4-year induction and mentoring program, called the Comprehensive Induction Program (CIP), to advance their licenses. The CIP offers a set of professional learning activities that can be tailored to meet a combination of state, district, and school goals. (For more information about this state example, see Building Adult Capacity and Expertise.)
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Last Updated: May 20, 2022
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To support teachers who started their careers during the COVID-19 pandemic, Illinois started the Virtual Instructional Coach and Building Mentor Program. The Illinois State Board of Education and the state teachers’ associations collaborated to pair new teachers with veteran educators to serve as mentors in their buildings and as virtual coaches. New teachers are provided comprehensive supports, including a virtual instructional coach, certified in the same area of instruction, who is trained to provide support for beginning teachers in online instruction, social and emotional learning, and trauma-informed practices; a trained and certified building mentor whose sole responsibility is to make the new teacher feel welcomed, supported, and connected in his or her new school; access to a virtual coaching platform with an online library of resources and a way to connect to other first-year teachers; and support and feedback via one-on-one and small-group virtual coaching sessions.
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Last Updated: May 20, 2022
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The Mississippi Department of Education partnered with the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards to have National Board Certified Teachers (NBCTs) leading professional learning communities on early learning literacy and instructional strategies. NBCTs led year-round workshops for early-career teachers focused on National Board standards and provided them with models of accomplished teaching. The early-career teachers reported being more prepared and confident, and 40% of them began pursuing National Board Certification once they became eligible. The teachers were put on a trajectory toward National Board Certification and were provided opportunities for teacher leadership roles and increased salary. (For more information about this state example, see Building Adult Capacity and Expertise.)

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Last Updated: May 20, 2022
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New Mexico House Bill 62, enacted in 2020, requires school districts and charter schools to have formal teacher mentorship programs that are approved annually by the New Mexico Public Education Department. The law also creates the Beginning Teacher Mentorship Fund, which is directed to distribute up to $2,000 for each new teacher every year to support the teacher mentorship programs.
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Last Updated: May 20, 2022
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Building Adult Capacity and Expertise
Promote High-Quality Professional Development Linked to Growth-Oriented Evaluation Systems

Alabama’s Reflective Coaching (ARC) model incorporates evidence-based elements of effective teacher professional development (PD)—specific content foci, active learning and practice, modeling and observation, and individualized reflection and feedback. ARC uses a tiered approach to tailor the coaching intensity to the needs of the early educators within each program. Coaching is delivered across a mixed delivery system for both pre-k and child care, including school sites, Head Start, community-based providers, and in-home child care. (For more information about this state example, see Building Adult Capacity and Expertise.)

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Last Updated: May 20, 2022
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In 2021, California invested $1.5 billion to establish the Educator Effectiveness Block Grant, which issues funds to districts to provide professional learning to school staff who interact with students, including teachers, administrators, and paraprofessionals. Training can focus on specified topics, including strategies to implement social and emotional learning (SEL) and trauma-informed practices, as well as practices to create a positive school climate, including restorative justice and implicit bias training. (For more information about this state example, see Building Adult Capacity and Expertise.)
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Last Updated: May 20, 2022
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Enacted in 2018, Colorado Senate Bill 272 created the Crisis and Suicide Prevention Training Grant Program to assist schools in providing professional development to teachers, administrators, and staff around mental health crisis and suicide prevention. The program is authorized to provide up to $400,000 in grants per year to schools, with a priority to expand training to those who have not previously received training in crisis and suicide prevention.
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Last Updated: May 20, 2022
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Illinois House Bill 355 went into effect in January 2020, creating new requirements for renewing a professional teaching license in Illinois. Among other changes, the bill expands teacher professional development activities for social and emotional learning. For example, during each 5-year renewal period, the bill allows professional development providers to include training on inclusive practices that improve students’ academic and social-emotional outcomes. In addition, social-emotional achievement and student well-being are highlighted in one of the five focus areas for licensure renewal.
IL
Last Updated: May 20, 2022
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Iowa Senate Bill 2113, enacted in 2018, requires school districts to provide annual training on preventing youth suicide, addressing adverse childhood experiences, and recognizing unhealthy stress. The bill instructed school districts to provide this training for all school personnel annually starting in July 2019.
IA
Last Updated: May 20, 2022
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The Blueprint for Maryland’s Future lays out a four-level career ladder that allows teachers to advance in the profession while remaining in the classroom, with incentives for National Board Certification. Level four includes three distinct teacher leadership roles: (1) lead teacher, (2) distinguished teacher, or (3) professor distinguished teacher.
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Last Updated: May 20, 2022
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In November 2019, Massachusetts started the Kaleidoscope Collective for Learning pilot program to provide educators and schools leaders with professional learning opportunities to strengthen their understanding of deeper learning and advance deeper learning in schools across the state. The program provides educators with opportunities to deepen their understanding of deeper learning and share best practices with each other. Such opportunities include coaching, ongoing convenings, development of exemplar curriculum and innovative test items, and an online learning platform. Massachusetts established the first cohort of participating schools in January 2020, choosing 21 schools to participate. The second cohort of 15 schools began a 3-year project with Kaleidoscope in the spring of 2021. Both cohorts include a diversity of school grade spans and geographic locations.
MA
Last Updated: May 20, 2022
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The Massachusetts Educator Evaluation Framework provides teachers with feedback to improve student learning, opportunities for professional growth, and structures for accountability. The framework includes standards of practice, rubrics, and three categories of evidence to assess educators’ performance on the standards: (1) multiple measures of student learning, growth, and achievement; (2) judgments based on observations and artifacts of professional practice; and (3) additional evidence, including student feedback when evaluating teachers and staff feedback when evaluating administrators.
MA
Last Updated: May 20, 2022
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